ABOUT ME

  • This blog is maintained by Stephen Filler, a New York-based attorney with expertise in business law, contracts, intellectual property and litigation. He represents a wide variety of businesses, technology, media companies and individuals. He also provides legal and consulting services to sustainable, environmental and renewable energy businesses, non-profit organizations and trade organizations. He is on the board of the New York Solar Energy Industries Association and Secretary of the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater. His business website is www.nylawline.com.

    The Green Counsel consulting website is www.greencounsel.com.

Sustainability Ring

  • Sustainability Web Ring 
control panel
Blog powered by Typepad

« Extension of Solar Tax Credit Proposed in Washington | Main | "Reality has a well-known Liberal bias" »

Comments

Summer

I do not support taxing something to merely assist in the process of trying to get rid of it. However, the government has done this before.

I do agree that it will take consumer demand, corporate willingness, and true leadership (someone who will rise above the petty politics and lead the country, not worry about polls or keeping a section of the country happy) in order to get there.

Consumer demand is increasing and when the prices fall in a couple of years, that will mostly go away. However, it has started a series of reactions that will have a tremendous impact on our energy future anyway.

Stephen Filler

Summer,

Thanks for posting. Is there a specific problem with taxing to assist in getting rid of it? And if you are not in favor of taxing for this purpose, are there other effective mechanisms? Why is taxation a less preferred method?

Unfortunately, it's not just the polls or regional influence that supports the oil industry in Washington, but maybe mostly the insidious campaign contributions and cozy relationship between large oil interests and washington officials.

Summer

I think of such taxation as a tool of a tyrant and not something to be used as a club against something we do not like in a land that is supposed to have freedom. Not only that but it may also have a huge negative impact on the poor, who are less able to adapt to such things when compared to those better off.

Therefore, I like the drive of consumer demand even though it can bring about some changes at a snail's pace.

I think that we need more education out there about what is going on and how it impacts us today and tomorrow. That, combined with the random temporary spikes in energy cost, will help push us into a new energy economy.

Not to mention that we simply lack the infrastructure and a viable inexpensive solution to the problem at the moment. There is going to be something similar to a standard's war between different hybrids vs complete alternative energy turnovers. It will be expensive and it will drive new technologies and once over it will leave us with the beginning of the infrastructure needed to move us in a positive direction.

Juno888

I think that we need more education out there about what is going on and how it impacts us today and tomorrow. That, combined with the random temporary spikes in energy cost, will help push us into a new energy economy.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Subscribe

  • Subscribe to GreenCounsel feed:
  • Recieve GreenCounsel posts by email:
    Enter your Email


    Powered by FeedBlitz



  • Headlines from the Green Blogosphere
    Provided by First Sustainable
    Add this box to your site
    Add your feed to this box



Bottom of Page